Monday, 25 November 2013

November Reads: Cavan Library Reading Group

Some interesting reads are being recommended this month by the members of Cavan's Reading Group. Read along with us and sharing your thoughts here! 
Click on any of the book images to reserve any read on our Catalogue...

The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne by Brian Moore

Judith Hearne is an unmarried woman of a certain age who has come down in society. She has few skills and is full of the prejudices and pieties of her genteel Belfast upbringing. But Judith has a secret life. And she is just one heartbreak away from revealing it to the world.An Officer and a Spy by Robert Harris

They lied to protect their country. He told the truth to save it. Narrated by Picquart, An Officer and a Spy is a compelling recreation of a scandal that became the most famous miscarriage of justice in history.

Cissie's Abbattoir by Dr √Čibhear Walshe

The author's personal journey takes us through his hometown, the buildings of his childhood city, his grandmother's abattoir, the Mental Hospital where his father works, and the Folly Church where he serves as an altar boy. It is the story of a city and the story of his journey from fear to pride but the most important character throughout is the entertaining, fashion-conscious, poker-playing Cissie, his lively and witty little grandmother who taught him by example how to survive and prosper, and how to live with style and verve. 


 This Party's got to stop by Rupert Thomson



On a warm day in 1964, Thomson’s mother dies suddenly. 20 years later, his father dies alone. In an attempt to come to terms with loss, he and his brothers move back into their father's house. This story reveals the fragility of family life and is both a love letter to family and a chronicle of the family splits that can tear people and communities apart.

Me and Mine by Anna May Mangan

This account of an extended Irish emigrant family’s experience in London from the early 1950s is thronged with prejudice, illness, death, poverty, hunger, gambling, sexual repression and domestic abuse. Despite this, what shines through is the warmth and loving nature of a family, beautifully and delicately described by a fine writer. 


Thursday, 21 November 2013

The Shortlist is announced for this year's Guardian first book award!

This annual literary award by The Guardian newspaper recognises one book by a new writer. Check out the shortlist here...

We Need New Names  by NoViolet Bulawayo

'To play the country-game, we have to choose a country. Everybody wants to be the USA and Britain and Canada and Australia and Switzerland and them.  Nobody wants to be rags of countries like Congo, like Somalia, like Iraq, like Sudan, like Haiti and not even this one we live in - who wants to be a terrible place of hunger and things falling apart?' Darling and her friends live in a shanty called Paradise, which of course is no such thing. It isn't all bad, though. There's mischief and adventure, games of Find bin Laden, stealing guavas, singing Lady Gaga at the tops of their voices.  They dream of the paradises of America, Dubai, Europe, where Madonna and Barack Obama and David Beckham live. For Darling, that dream will come true. But, like the thousands of people all over the world trying to forge new lives far from home, Darling finds this new paradise brings its own set of challenges - for her and also for those she's left behind.


Sex and the Citadel : Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World by Shereen  El-Feki

As political change sweeps the streets and squares, parliaments and presidential palaces of the Arab world, Shereen El Feki has been looking at upheaval a little closer to home - in the sexual lives of men and women in Egypt and across the region. The result is an informative, insightful and engaging account of a highly sensitive, and still largely secret, aspect of Arab society. Sex is entwined in religion and tradition, politics and economics, gender and generations, so it makes the perfect lens for examining the region's complex social landscape.  From pregnant virgins to desperate housewives, from fearless activists to religious firebrands, Sex and the Citadel takes a fresh look at the sexual history of the Arab region, and brings new voices to the debate over its future. This is no peep show or academic treatise. Sex and the Citadel is a highly personal, often humorous, account of one woman's journey to better understand Arab society at its most intimate, and in the process, better understand her own origins.  Rich with five years of groundbreaking research from Egypt to Saudi Arabia, Tunisia to Qatar, Sex and the Citadel gives us unique and timely insight into everyday lives in a part of the world that is changing in front of our very eyes.

The Spinning Heart by Donal Ryan

"My father still lives back the road past the weir in the cottage I was reared in. I go there every day to see is he dead and every day he lets me down.  He hasn't yet missed a day of letting me down." In the aftermath of Ireland's financial collapse, dangerous tensions surface in an Irish town. As violence flares, the characters face a battle between public persona and inner desires. Through a chorus of unique voices, each struggling to tell their own kind of truth, a single authentic tale unfolds.  The Spinning Heart speaks for contemporary Ireland like no other novel. Wry, vulnerable, all-too human, it captures the language and spirit of rural Ireland and with uncanny perception articulates the words and thoughts of a generation. Technically daring and evocative of Patrick McCabe and J.M.  Synge, this novel of small-town life is witty, dark and sweetly poignant. Donal Ryan's brilliantly realized debut announces a stunning new voice in literary fiction.


Burial Rites by Hannah Kent

In northern Iceland, 1829, Agnes Magnusdottir is condemned to death for her part in the brutal murder of her lover. Agnes is sent to wait out her final months on the farm of district officer Jon Jonsson, his wife and their two daughters.  Horrified to have a convicted murderer in their midst, the family avoid contact with Agnes. Only Toti, the young assistant priest appointed Agnes's spiritual guardian, is compelled to try to understand her. As the year progresses and the hardships of rural life force the household to work side by side, Agnes's story begins to emerge and with it the family's terrible realization that all is not as they had assumed.  Based on actual events, Burial Rites is an astonishing and moving novel about the truths we claim to know and the ways in which we interpret what we're told. In beautiful, cut-glass prose, Hannah Kent portrays Iceland's formidable landscape, in which every day is a battle for survival, and asks, how can one woman hope to endure when her life depends upon the stories told by others?

Kiss Me First by Lottie Moggach


Leila has never met Tess, but she now knows more about Tess than anyone in the world. She's read all of her emails, researched her past and asked Tess for every detail about her friends and family. Tess has never met Leila.  But if she wants to slip away from the world unnoticed, she needs to trust Leila with her life. At first, Leila finds it easy to assume Tess's identity, and no one has any reason to distrust her. But as Leila is soon to discover, there is much more to a person than the facts and there are things about life you can learn only by living it ...Original, haunting and utterly gripping, Kiss Me First is an electrifying debut from a phenomenally gifted storyteller.